My obligatory iPhone post

I don’t know what I can add to the discussion around Apple’s latest unveiling, but I feel obliged to say something.

In 1993, Apple released the Newton. This was CEO John Sculley’s big dream project. It was going to be his Macintosh. However, from a standpoint of market acceptance, it failed.

Now, Steve Jobs loathes John Sculley. He’s been quoted saying about Sculley, “”What can I say? I hired the wrong guy. He destroyed everything I spent 10 years working for; starting with me, but that wasn’t the saddest part. I would have gladly left Apple if Apple would have turned out like I wanted it to.”

So, I just get the sense that, every step in the 2-and-a-half year development of iPhone, Jobs had this bone to pick with Sculley, and that Jobs’ portable computing device was going to be nothing short of “insanely great,” and that at every step, he was determined to not just surpass, but blow away his predecessors.

Because, that’s the thing with the iPhone. Everyone knew it was coming. No one knew how it was going to transcend their expectations. It is such a quantum leap forward, not just for a phone, but for the whole field of consumer electronics, and I don’t think we’ll understand the implications until a good year or so after its release.

Other thoughts

This is a remarkable Trojan Horse on the whole netphone front. Yes, it’s a GSM mobile phone and there’s an exclusive deal with Cingular. But also, it’s a mobile wi-fi device, and so, why use Cingular if you can just Skype?

2 megapixel camera — impressive. But does it only have still picture capability? Considering they’ve put an iSight in everyone of their computers, I’m surprised that iPhone doesn’t have a video camera built in.

I drop my mobile phone with some frequency, and my iPod occasionally. How rugged is this device?

It’s a little strange that they ended up calling this “iPhone,” considering it’s essentially a small tablet PC. I mean, it probably makes sense from a marketing perspective, but I’m curious as to what happens when “the street finds its uses” for the device. I wouldn’t be surprised if phone calls is not the primary function.

6 thoughts on “My obligatory iPhone post

  1. […] ELSEWHERE PeterMe asks the same question: “why use Cingular if you can just Skype?” January 9, 2007 at 9:35 pm by Garrick Van Buren Tags: Apple […]

  2. “But also, it’s a mobile wi-fi device, and so, why use Cingular if you can just Skype?”

    Cause Apple might not let you…and it sounds like the iPhone’s going to be closed to third-party software.

  3. I’m willing to bet that the “closed platform” thing goes away between now and launch … I hope. I have heard rumors that Python is going to be a first-class development platform with Cocoa bindings in 10.5, which may filter down to this device. And, even if it’s really “closed”, it still has a highly-capable browser built-in, so 3rd party app development could just be a matter of some HTML + Javascript. In other words, OMFG WHERE IS MINE?

  4. I can change the battery myself on my current cell phone – can I change the battery on this i-phone or do I need to send it to Apple?

  5. Suggest how the keyboard feels and functions will be the make or break feature.

  6. from: http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/news/comments/apples-jobs-more-iphone-apps-coming-before-launch/9320

    Apple’s Jobs: ‘You don’t want your phone to be like a PC’

    Apple CEO Steve Jobs says consumers can expect more mobile applications for the iPhone by the time the device ships in June—but that Apple will control what applications make it onto the iPhone, much like it has done with every iPod.